Saturday, April 2, 2011

Nashotah House Updates Their Website

Nashotah House Theological Seminary, the place where the Northwoods Seelsorger has chosen to pursue his post-graduate studies for the present, recently updated their website with a much more attractive and interactive setting.   Faculty profiles include video introductions from the dean of the seminary as well as the associate dean of academic affairs, one of Northwoods' professors during the last two terms. While the site is a vast improvement over its previous one, it is obvious that it is still in a state of development.

Nashotah House positions itself within the Anglo-Catholic tradition, emphasizing the Benedictine Rule as the specific discipline of its spiritual and communal life.  Although my initial intentions last year included centering my studies in the Biblical Studies emphasis, it turns out that as much of my studies will end up in the area of liturgics, specifically liturgical history, an area that happens to be a unique strength at Nashotah.  This summer I will be registering for a class on the history and practice of the church year and an additional course on the history of English hymnody.  These will be the last two required courses of my degree (S.T.M.), and I am awaiting approval of my thesis topic.  The proposed topic concerns the Apocalypse and Worship, with an examination of the role and early omission of the Apocalypse in the lectionary and liturgical rites of the church along with a study of the inclusion of the Dignus Est in the later liturgy of the church.  My intent is to combine my biblical studies efforts with my work in liturgics, utilizing an interdisciplinary  approach instead of a single discipline.  Stayed tuned for further developments....

6 comments:

Rev. David M. Juhl said...

I was beginning to wonder about their website. I thought Nashotah went all Luddite and turned their back on cyberspace. Thanks for the post!

marilyn lingenfelter said...

There's a fascinating book entitled, "The Lord's Supper" by Dr. Scott Hahn, a protestant convert to catholic, who writes about his research into the Church Fathers on the Book of Revelation and how it closely it follows the Liturgy of the Mass, and not
just the phraes from Scripture that we find in the Liturgy but images, etc., as well. Thought it might be of interest to you in your studies and choise of subject matter at Natoash.

The Rev. Donald V. Engebretson said...

Thank you, Marilyn, for the book suggestion. It sounds like a work worth reading!

The Rev. Donald V. Engebretson said...

P.S. In case others want to check out this recommended book by Dr. Hahn, the actual title is "The Lamb's Supper," (1999). You can read a review of it on Amazon at:
http://www.amazon.com/Lambs-Supper-Mass-Heaven-Earth/dp/0385496591

Pr Mark Henderson said...

Your resaerch sounds intriguing, Donald.
And it must also be interesting being a Lutheran in an Anglo-Catholic setting (I'm assuming there are some residential requirements?).

Best wishes!

The Rev. Donald V. Engebretson said...

Thank you, Mark - Yes, it is interesting being a Lutheran among the Anglo-Catholics. I especially appreciate their dedication to the fullness of the historic liturgy. Nashotah House is also known as a relatively conservative haven in the midst of the quite liberal Episcopal Church. Thus, biblical studies there does not mean a constant dose of higher-critical fare.

As to residency requirements, they are similar, if not the same, as what one would find at CTS or CS in the STM program for non-resident graduate students. Summer courses are normally two week intensives and the Epiphany term in January is a one week intensive. Either way you log at least 30 total hours of classroom time. Extensive reading precedes the class and papers follow. Last summer I ended up submitting a 40 page paper for one of my liturgics classes, my longest writing assignment to date.